Rapper T.I. Named to Atlanta's City Jail Task Force

Rapper T.I. Named to Atlanta's City Jail Task Force

A newly formed task force charged with finding a new use for Atlanta’s city jail includes criminal justice reform volunteers, activists, council members and rapper T.I. The city announced the 25 members named to the task force in a news release late Tuesday, six weeks after deciding to create a task force to repurpose the Atlanta City Detention Center. 

Atlanta City Jail Task Force has 9 Months to Give Bottoms Suggestions

Atlanta City Jail Task Force has 9 Months to Give Bottoms Suggestions

City leaders and community members met for the first time Tuesday to begin the work of finding a new use for the Atlanta city jail. And they have a tight deadline: recommendations must be delivered to Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms by February 2020.

Mayor Bottoms Announces the ‘Reimagining Atlanta’ City Detention Center Task Force Members

Mayor Bottoms Announces the ‘Reimagining Atlanta’ City Detention Center Task Force Members

Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announces the members of the Reimagining Atlanta City Detention Center (ACDC) Task Force. The Task Force is charged with evaluating a use for the Detention Center that could benefit the entire community.

'Atlanta's Got a Mayor Named Keisha' Lance Bottoms: What Exactly Does That Mean For Black People?

'Atlanta's Got a Mayor Named Keisha' Lance Bottoms: What Exactly Does That Mean For Black People?

“My mayor’s name is Keisha,” or “Atlanta’s got a mayor named Keisha” became a catchphrase, a hashtag, and a mantra splashed across t-shirts. It was shouted and sang with equal parts reverence, excitement, disbelief, and joy—but, in some circles, it was said with skepticism and caution. All skinfolk aren’t kinfolk, so Black people around the nation waited to see how Bottoms would navigate her power.

SNaP: MARCH 4 The Gurlz

SNaP: MARCH 4 The Gurlz

We all know that Black trans women are among the most marginalized demographics in the population, and  SNaP Co got started some years ago through an initiative to address that in Atlanta. As Kamau Walton, SNaP’s media director, describes it: the goal of SNaP is to discover and rally for actual solutions to problems facing Black and Brown trans women without punishment and criminalization. Another leader of the organization, Jamie Freya, said about the goals of the march and rally: “it’s gonna be a space to heal, to be celebrated, to be affirmed, to be uplifted. That’s what it’s really gonna give immediately.”